DAN Diving Saftey advice from the diver insurance company

Diving Safety

Dive Safety Information Presented by:

DAN dive safety information – divers insurance policy, DAN Asia-Pacific, Your Buddy in Dive Safety

SAFE DIVING TIPS

All diving involves a degree of risk, because, after all, we are air-breathing mammals and are not designed for breathing underwater. If we accept this premise, and admit to ourselves that we are voluntarily entering an alien environment, we are more likely to approach our diving with a sensible degree of caution. We must also acknowledge that we rely totally on our equipment while diving.

These safety hints apply to ALL dives and should be read in addition to those hints for specific types of diving.

  • Be trained by a recognised agency. Such diver training will make you aware of the more common problems you will face underwater, and how to reduce the likelihood of these problems occurring.
  • Be sure that you are medically fit for diving. Some medical conditions are not compatible with safe diving, while other conditions may allow you to dive safely with caution. It is important that divers over 40 receive regular medical check-ups.
  • Be sure that you are physically fit for diving. Diving may require exertion beyond what is usual for you and it is important that you are fit enough to deal with this.
  • Thoroughly prepare and check your gear prior to diving. You rely totally on your dive equipment while underwater.
  • Choose dives that match your training, experience and confidence. Dive within your comfort zone on all dives.
  • Listen to your inner voice. If you do not feel right while underwater, or you feel that you have exceeded your comfort level, abort the dive.
  • Watch your ascent rate on all dives. You should never exceed an ascent rate of 10m/minute when diving shallower than about 30m. An ascent rate of 5-6 metres per minute is recommended in the last 10m of ascent.
  • Complete safety stops on all dives that exceed 10m depth. Safety stops assist with reduction of excess nitrogen, which reduces the risk of DCI. They also slow your ascent rate, by forcing you to stop for a period of time. The rule of thumb is 3-5 minutes at 5-6 metres. An additional deeper stop may sometimes be beneficial after deeper dives.
  • Always dive with a buddy. Your safety and your enjoyment will be enhanced by being with a companion while underwater.
  • Plan your dive. You and your buddy should agree on depth, time, air cut-off, and safety stops.
  • Plan your dive so you surface with a minimum of 50bar. Don’t look at it as wasted air, but as insurance against the possibility of some emergency that causes your air consumption to increase.
  • If you have had a layoff from diving, or you have been unwell, do some easier dives to regain your confidence and skill.
  • Revise your skills regularly. Practise such survival skills as mask-clearing, regulator removal, and air-sharing regularly.
  • Log your dives. A record of your diving history may come in very handy should you ever seek higher levels of training.

DIVING EMERGENCIES

As divers, we hope to never find ourselves in need of emergency medical assistance as a result of a diving accident. However, statistics highlight that accidents do happen, even to the most experienced divers, so we should all have a plan of action that will prepare us for the unexpected.

If you ever find yourself in an emergency situation, when in Australia, your first step should be to call the Divers Alert Network (DAN) funded Diving Emergency Services Medical Hotline on 1800 088 200

If you are calling from Outside Australia you need to call: +61-8-8212 9242.
This number is available to all divers throughout the world.

As we all know many of the world’s top dive destinations are in remote areas that are difficult to access and often result in significant costs in terms of emergency evacuation and subsequent medical treatment. Therefore, DAN strongly recommends that all divers be adequately covered for such a contingency. And remember, if you are prepared for the unexpected you can focus on what’s most important … enjoying your diving!


 

All DAN Diver Courses offered by Mermaids CDC – Pattaya, Thailand

  • DAN – Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries
  • DAN – On-site Neurological Assessment for Divers
  • DAN – Automated External Defibrillators
  • DAN – First Aid for Hazardous Marine- Life Injuries
  • DAN – First Aid – Level 1 – Emergency Life Support

Information:



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